Collection of dementia-friendly community case studies across Europe

The Collection of dementia-friendly community case studies across Europe or so called mapping paper, has been produced as a way of sharing information about the so called ‘dementia-friendly community’ activities across Europe.

It has been commissioned by the European Foundations’ Initiative on Dementia (EFID) and produced by a UK non-governmental organisation, the Mental Health Foundation.

The aim of the paper is to map what it is commonly referred to as ‘dementia-friendly community’ work and inspire people to develop ‘dementia-friendly community’ activities in their own local areas, or within their area of particular knowledge or expertise, policy or practice.

You can access the different sections of the mapping paper by clicking on the links below.

Introduction

This collection of case studies or so called mapping paper, has been produced as a way of sharing information about ‘dementia-friendly community’ activities across Europe. It has been commissioned by the European Foundations’ Initiative on Dementia (EFID) and produced by a UK non-governmental organisation, the Mental Health Foundation.

The aim of the paper is to map what it is commonly referred to as ‘dementia-friendly community’ work and inspire people to develop ‘dementia-friendly community’ activities in their own local areas, or within their area of particular knowledge or expertise, policy or practice.

The contents of the paper have been informed by an online survey, telephone interviews and literature review of ‘dementia-friendly community’ activities across Europe that were commissioned by EFID and undertaken by the Mental Health Foundation between May 2014 and May 2015. The report “Mapping dementia-friendly community across Europe: a study commissioned by the European Foundations’ Initiative on Dementia (EFID)” summarises the fi ndings from the research. You can read the full report here.

‘Dementia-friendly communities’

‘Dementia-friendly communities’ are a growing phenomenon across Europe and other parts of the world. The numbers of people with dementia continues to increase, mainly because of increased life expectancy and growing numbers of older people. There are many different types of dementia (Alzheimer’s disease is the most common) but they are all brain diseases affecting a person’s memory, perception, understanding, orientation, and communication. There is currently no cure or universally effective treatment for the condition and the concept of ‘dementia-friendly communities’ has developed as a collective approach to enable people with dementia to live as well as possible with the condition.

How the mapping paper is organised

It is organised under three main domain headings representing factors which the study “Mapping dementia-friendly community across Europe” identified as being fundamental to the development of ‘dementia-friendly communities’:

  1. Raising awareness, providing information, education and training;
  2. Inclusion of people with dementia: involvement, participation, infl uencing; and
  3. Building partnerships, networks, collaboration.

Examples of selected papers

The mapping paper contains 48 examples of ‘dementia-friendly community’ projects, activities and initiatives. These include projects, videos, organisations, networks, campaigns and other form of initiatives.

Both the authors of the paper and EFID wish to emphasise that the examples illustrate the diversity of ‘dementia-friendly community’ activity but have not been evaluated or chosen as examples of ‘best practice’.

There are many other ‘dementia-friendly community’ initiatives within Europe: this mapping contains just a cross-section of those that were found during our information-gathering and there were many other examples identified that have not been included.
Omission in no way reflects on the quality or contribution of other activities.

The criteria used to select examples included ensuring a diversity of projects, activities and initiatives:

  • across a range of European countries;
  • in different types of communities (e.g. urban/rural, large/small, geographical, communities of ‘identity’, etc.);
  • reflecting a balance across the three main domains, and types of ‘dementia-friendly communities’ identified in the DEM-FACT;
  • examples that had been referred to in the report describing the findings from the literature review and survey.

In addition to the survey and literature review, the paper is also informed by other work done by the European Foundations’ Initiative on Dementia, notably the awards that were given to outstanding ‘dementia-friendly community’ projects in 2012 and 2014.
For full information about the EFID Awards “Living well with Dementia in the Community” click here. In total EFID rewarded 20 organisations in 11 countries.

Useful resources

Case studies